Details are everything. Vegan rhubarb tart recipe.

Do you have a plan, Mr Fix?
Yes, I have 3 plans.
Should  Mr. Fix  live in our time, he could have  a successful consulting business for entrepreneurs and bloggers. He has certainly learned from his own experience that the implementation of any project depends on the degree of detail elaboration, any super mega idea and concept can be realized only through a thoroughly prepared plan.
The fantastic project may fail due to onе, but important  detail  missing: time can be lost or resources may be wasted. Like in a recipe, if there were no baking powder added, the cake will not be fluffy and thus, tasty.

Attention to details is an important skill that saves time, money and nerves.

Modern coaches of personal effectiveness offer a tremendous  number of techniques and courses to develop this skill. I will share my personal secret: vegan life style trains attention to “details” naturally and daily.

Following  a vegan diet I do  monitor what I eat and buy, therefore carefully read the ingredients when shopping.

Thus I developed a habit to pay attention to details. And why? Not all “natural” or “healthy” products  consist of  100% plant based ingredients.
Let’s check on gelatine. Is gelatine vegan? Gelatine is a hydrolysed protein collagen, a transparent viscous mass, a product of processing (denaturation) of the connective tissue of animals (collagen), it is made from the skin, tendons and bones of animals to “glue” elements.

You can find gelatine in food too, in jam, marmalade and other sweets, cakes and pies.

There are excellent plant substitutes for gelatine: pectin and agar agar. When you buy jam, please  check on the label if  the manufacturer uses  gelatine or pectin. If I see jam in the breakfast buffet  in the hotel, I always ask, as very often even expensive hotels use gelatine while making  their home jam.

Gelatine is often used to produce  capsules for vitamins, other medicines and herbal pills.

Some of my vegan friends solve the capsule problem simply, they cut the capsule in halves , use the contents, and discard the capsule.
But from the point of view of the “organic” life style  this solution  is monstrous. The capsules were produced, the animals were killed, and the end user, the buyer, is financing this murder.

“But what can you do about it?” – they would sigh sadly.

May be is there still something in our hands? If  we continue to buy products with gelatine, we continue to fund the entire productive chain, which means that suppliers continue to use gelatine and in fact, sadly, we, consumers remain a part  in animal killing and environmental pollution.

In fact, we have super powerful tool : our money to support an organic vegan producer.

These manufacturers will win a competition, because modern technology allows now to produce capsules from cellulose, and to replace gelatine with with plant based pectin or agar agar.

If you like so much the unique qualities of your favourite product, then please write to the manufacturer a request to upgrade the technology to a vegan one. By the way, this is a perfect opportunity to improve your writing and negotiations skills.

During  3 years I have been writing  to our office  canteen, I sent  vegan recipes, environmental and health benefits of vegan diet. I guess  I was not alone, because in Austria the vegan life style has been  turning into a modern popular trend. Since a couple of years already our office canteen offers vegan meals in the daily menu and very often the chef treats us with vegan desserts.

White refined sugar, wine and beer, vitamins (A, B, D for example), glycerin and enzymes, food colours and flavours, chewing gum and toothpaste may contain animal ingredients. I prefer to buy them with vegan labelling or from a trusted manufacturer.

The application Is it Vegan can be very handful when shopping.
Well, for dessert to this  serious theme about the details importance  and planning I chose a veganised recipe of rhubarb tart. It even turned out to be simpler and it’s easy to make.

In case the guests arrive spontaneously, this tart will perfectly work as a plan B.

By the way, rhubarb emerges usually already in late spring ahead of berries season and contain a lot of ascorbic acid, i.e.  vitamin C.

Rhubarb tart recipe. Veganised.

Ingredients

CRUST

  • Whole grain flour – 125 g
  • Plant based margarine (or coconut oil) – 90 g
  • Sugar ( or any other vegan sweetener) – 40 g
  • Vanille
  • Vegan baking powder – 1/2 t sp or in accordance with the instruction

CREAM

  • Rhubarb – 3 stalks
  • Starch – 40 g
  • Hazelnut or any other plant based “mylk” – 400 ml
  • Sugar ( or any other vegan sweetener) – 40 g
  • Lemon zest – from 1/2 of a lemon
  • Thymus
  • Walnuts or hazelnuts – 2-3 TbSp

Directions

  1. Melt the margarine
  2. Mix flour, sugar, baking powder and vanille. Add melted margarine or coconut oil and mix it in homogenous dough. If it is difficult to mix, add a little bit water to smoothen the process.
  3. Fat the bakeware with plant based margarine or coconut oil. Place dough in the baking plate by spoon or even fingers, leave it to cool down.
  4. Mix in a pot plant based “mylk”, sugar and vanille, bring to the cream to a boiling point. Mix starch well with a small amount of cold water or milk and pour slowly into the cream stirring, cook further 1-2 minutes on the low to mid heat stirring.
  5. Remove from the heat, add grated lemon zest and finely chopped thymus leaves, stir and leave to cool down and to thicken.
  6. Nuts ( may be optionally pre soaked in water) chop finely using  knife.
  7. Rinse and peel off rhubarb stalks. Cut the stalks into slices 8-10 mm.
  8. Spread nuts over the crust, then place rhubarb slices, pour cream over.
  9. Bake in the oven 35- 40 minutes until ready at 175C.

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